Lightning Learns About Radiology

Posted on Saturday, February 9th, 2013 at 7:59 pm
Hello Class!
 
What an awesome time I had working with Dr. Schimmel (Kate’s Dad) as a radiologist.  The human body is so fascinating.  It’s amazing we can use technology to look inside the human body to find out what’s wrong when we are sick.  I interviewed Dr. Schimmel about his job and this is what I learned:

Lightning with Mr. Skeleton.

Lightning with Mr. Skeleton.

 
1.  What is your job?
 
I am a Radiologist.  A Radiologist is a doctor who uses technology such as x-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine to evaluate individual’s bodies to see what is wrong with them.  I analyze the pictures and then dictate a report for the patient’s doctor.  Sometimes I have to stick needles into my patients organs to collect some cells so they can be looked at under the microscope to see what is wrong.  

Lightning analyzing a chest x-ray.

Lightning analyzing a chest x-ray.

 
2.  Do you provide goods or services?
 
I provide services, both to other doctors who need help with a diagnosis and to patients.  
 
3.  Is your job located in the city, suburbs, or rural community?
 
I work at the Air Force Academy Clinic.  However, Radiologists can work in all of these locations.  
 
4.  How do you interact with other members of our community in your job duties?
 
I interact with other types of doctors as well as patients.  Sometimes I have really good news if my patient doesn’t have a disease but sometimes I have bad news if a patient is really sick.  I might have helped a few of your moms and dads and maybe you as well.
 
5.  How does your job support our community?
 
My job is important to help our community be healthy.

Lightning getting a CT scan.

Lightning getting a CT scan.

 
6. What would happen if your job did not exist in our community?
 
It would be more difficult for other doctors to make a diagnosis, that is to find what is wrong with the patient.  For example, it would be difficult to know if a bone is fractured (broken) or if a patient has a tumor.
Thanks to everyone on base for making me feel so welcome. I learned a lot about being a radiologist!
Until next time,
Lightning
You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: